Tag Archives: roman missal

A clarification on seeking orthodoxy within the two forms of the Roman Liturgy, ordinaria and extraordinaria

Received a fraternal correction today on Facebook concerning the orthodoxy we seek within the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass… First, my comment on the release of INSTRUCTION ON THE APPLICATION OF THE APOSTOLIC LETTER SUMMORUM PONTIFICUM :

“It’s about time, it’s about space, it’s about orthodoxy taking its rightful place…”

The correction came…

The absence of a Mass in the Extraordinary Form is not an indication of a lack of orthodoxy. Indeed, the Holy See’s instruction itself says: “6. The Roman Missal promulgated by Pope Paul VI and the last edition prepared under Pope John XXIII, are two forms of the Roman Liturgy, defined respectively as ordinaria and extraordinaria: they are two usages of the one Roman Rite, one alongside the other. Both are the expression of the same lex orandi of the Church.”.

I couldn’t agree and support this statement more. It’s a teaching of the Church.. However, I could supply ample proof(s), from this blog alone, of disobedience to mass norms and resulting unorthodox liturgical practices played out within the Mass. The crisis of disobedience and irreverence seemingly ever-present within the Church in our days is exemplified here, and like many I’m just simply tired of abuses found within the Mass. Not to mention having to sit through Protestant-nized masses offering us musical treats similar to the following…  

END OF POST

(Full Text) Fr. Anthony Ruff, O.S.B. — An Open Letter to the U.S. Catholic Bishops on the Forthcoming Missal

Roman Missal (editio tipica 1962)
Roman Missal (editio tipica 1962)

From AMERICA

Your Eminences, Your Excellencies,

With a heavy heart, I have recently made a difficult decision concerning the new English missal. I have decided to withdraw from all my upcoming speaking engagements on the Roman Missal in dioceses across the United States. After talking with my confessor and much prayer, I have concluded that I cannot promote the new missal translation with integrity. I’m sure bishops want a speaker who can put the new missal in a positive light, and that would require me to say things I do not believe.

I love the Church, I love the sacred liturgy, I love chant in Latin and English, and I treasure being involved with all these as a monk and priest. It has been an honor to serve until recently as chairman of the music committee of the International Commission on English in the Liturgy (ICEL) that prepared all the chants for the new missal. But my involvement in that process, as well as my observation of the Holy See’s handling of scandal, has gradually opened my eyes to the deep problems in the structures of authority of our church.

The forthcoming missal is but a part of a larger pattern of top-down impositions by a central authority that does not consider itself accountable to the larger church. When I think of how secretive the translation process was, how little consultation was done with priests or laity, how the Holy See allowed a small group to hijack the translation at the final stage, how unsatisfactory the final text is, how this text was imposed on national conferences of bishops in violation of their legitimate episcopal authority, how much deception and mischief have marked this process—and then when I think of Our Lord’s teachings on service and love and unity…I weep.

I see a good deal of disillusionment with the Catholic Church among my friends and acquaintances. Some leave the Catholic Church out of conviction, some gradually drift away, some join other denominations, some remain Catholic with difficulty. My response is to stay in this church for life and do my best to serve her. This I hope to do by stating the truth as I see it, with charity and respect. I would be ready to participate in future liturgical projects under more favorable conditions.

I am sorry for the difficulties I am causing others by withdrawing, but I know this is the right thing to do. I will be praying for you and all leaders in our church.

Pax in Christo,

Fr. Anthony Ruff, O.S.B.

Anthony Ruff, O.S.B., is a Benedictine monk of Saint John’s Abbey and a professor of liturgy and Gregorian chant. He was on the committee which drafted the 2007 document “Sing to the Lord: Music in Divine Worship” for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. He is founder of the National Catholic Youth Choir and blogs at Pray Tell. His letter above to the U.S. bishops is printed in its entirety.

END OF POST/SOURCE

A simple chant version of the Gloria using the new mass translations

Hat Tip/The Anchoress

Corpus Christi Watershed, a nonprofit organization, has uploaded a video on YouTube of a version of the Glory to God that uses the Missal translation that will debut Nov. 27. The composer, Jeff Ostrowski, explained his intention here:

My intention was to create a dignified setting that was not too long, would not become tiresome over the years, yet was easy enough for an average congregation to sing well.

Check it out:

END OF POST

Cardinal George Announces Vatican Approval of New Roman Missal — Implementation Set for First Sunday of Advent 2011

The ineffable war of delay is over…

HT/J. Balza

U.S. Adaptations to Mass Prayers Also Approved
Parish Education Efforts Urged To Precede Implementation
Resources Available Through USCCB

WASHINGTON—Cardinal Francis George, OMI, Archbishop of Chicago and President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), has announced that the full text of the  English-language translation of the Roman Missal, Third Edition, has been issued for the dioceses of the United States of America. 
           
The text was approved by the Vatican, and the approval was accompanied by a June 23 letter from Cardinal Llovera Antonio Cañizares, Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments. The Congregation also provided guidelines for publication.
           
In addition, on July 24, the Vatican gave approval for several adaptations, including additional prayers for the Penitential Act at Mass and the Renewal of Baptismal Promises on Easter Sunday. Also approved are texts of prayers for feasts specific to the United States such as Thanksgiving, Independence Day and the observances of feasts for saints such as Damien of Molokai, Katharine Drexel, and Elizabeth Ann Seton. The Vatican also approved the Mass for Giving Thanks to God for the Gift of Human Life, which can be celebrated on January 22.   
           
Cardinal George announced receipt of the documents in an August 20 letter to the U.S. Bishops and issued a decree of proclamation that states that “The use of the third edition of the Roman Missal enters into use in the dioceses of the United States of America as of the First Sunday of Advent, November 27, 2011.  From that date forward, no other edition of the Roman Missal may be used in the dioceses of the United States of America.” 
           
The date of implementation was chosen to allow publishers time to prepare texts and parishes and dioceses to educate parishioners.
           
“We can now move forward and continue with our important catechetical efforts as we prepare the text for publication,” Cardinal George said.
           
In the coming weeks, staff of the bishops’ Secretariat of Divine Worship will prepare the text for publication and collaborate with the staff of the International Commission on English in the Liturgy (ICEL), which will assist Bishops’ Conferences in bringing the text to publication. In particular, ICEL has been preparing the chant settings of the texts of the Missal for use in the celebration of the Mass. Once all necessary elements have been incorporated into the text and the preliminary layout is complete, the final text will go to the publishers to produce the ritual text, catechetical resources and participation aids for use in the Liturgy.
           
Receipt of the text marks the start of proximate preparation for Roman Missal implementation. Before first use of the new text in Advent 2011, pastors are urged to use resources available to prepare parishioners. Some already have been in use; others are being released now. They include the Parish Guide for the Implementation of the Roman Missal, Third Edition, and Become One Body, One Spirit in Christ, a multi-media DVD resource produced by ICEL in collaboration with English-language Conferences of Bishops. Both will be available from the USCCB. Information on resources can be found at www.usccb.org/romanmissal
           
Bishop Arthur Serratelli of Paterson, New Jersey, Chair of the Bishops’ Committee on Divine Worship, voiced gratitude for the approval.
           
“I am happy that after years of preparation, we now have a text that, when introduced late next year, will enable the ongoing renewal of the celebration of the Sacred Liturgy in our parishes,” he said.  Msgr. Anthony Sherman, Director of the Secretariat for Divine Worship of the USCCB noted, “A great effort to produce the new Roman Missal for the United States, along with the other necessary resources, has begun.  Even as that work is underway a full–scale catechesis about the Liturgy and the new Roman Missal should be taking place in parishes, so that when the time comes, everyone will be ready.”

Report: Tuscan priest celebrates holy mass with iPad

“really easy to use.”

Wow. I’m not sure this liturgical development will be allowed to continue… What do you think?

This from the Cult of Mac:

The iPad has been called magical, but now it’s also mystical: at least one priest has used the latest and greatest Apple device to say holy mass.

A Catholic priest in Italy recently employed an iPad to perform an outdoor mass in the place of a heavy bible.

Don Michele Bigi, using the iPad to say mass at a summer camp in Gramolazzo (Tuscany) told The Apple Lounge that the Apple device was “really easy to use.”

It’s certainly lighter than most versions that churches use of the good book, although instead of using a specially-formulated Bible for iPad he adopted a PDF of the Roman Missal to perform the service.

When the iPad first launched, Italian priest Don Paolo Padrini who created runaway hit app iBreviary, said he thought the new device might be just the thing for readings during mass. Padrini also noted that there were no specific vetoes from the Vatican against using technology to perform services.

It’ll be interesting to see whether any entrepreneurs or church officials take up the challenge and devise a version of the Roman Missal for iPad.

Hat tip to Andrea Nepori

Via The Apple Lounge

END OF POST