Tag Archives: roman catholic women priests

Reading my surprise Christmas gift, ‘Theology of the Priesthood’, By Jean Galot, S.J. — Reviews anybody?

EDITOR: A quick search on this work revealed this informative concluding chapter on women and the priesthood. Not a few “Catholic” groups and individuals I know of would benefit mightily by humbly taking this essay to heart. (Maybe even save their own excommunicated souls…). 

Women and the Priesthood: A Theological Reflection | Jean Galot, S.J. | From Theology of the Priesthood

Editor’s Note: The following excerpt is from the concluding chapter of Fr. Galot’s Theology of the Priesthood, titled “The Mission of Woman and the Priesthood.” It comes after examinations of the claim to a priesthood for women, the ecumenical situation, and the teachings of Jesus, the New Testament, and the Church.

——————————————————————————–

The tradition of the Church, firm and unchanging, rests on the fundamental fact which is Christ’s own decision: Jesus chose only men to exercise the priestly ministry. His will revealed itself clearly in the choice of the Twelve, in the powers conferred upon them, and especially in the fact that he restricted to them alone participation in the Last Supper and entrusted to them the responsibility of the work of evangelization. This will has the mark of permanency in it, for, through the institution of this ministry, Jesus intended to insure the future of his Church and provide for the entire development to come. This will should not be ascribed to the prejudices of his time and place, nor to any notion on his part of woman’s inferiority, for he showed clearly how he resisted the mentality of his contemporaries, how resolved he was to restore equality between men and women, and how he intended to promote woman’s role in the work of salvation.

Upon this foundation we can, in theological reflection, gain a better understanding of what Jesus’ intention means and of the divine design that is expressed in it. Whatever the outcome of these reflections, whatever discussions may ensue because of them, the solidity of the foundation remains unshaken. When it comes to the solution of the issue, what is essential is the will of Christ, as acknowledged in tradition and supported by the definitive and ever present normativeness of Church authority. Theological reflection is only an attempt at perceiving the reasons that impelled that will, at grasping its scope and warrant with greater clarity and precision. [31]

I. PRIESTHOOD AND MALENESS

Why did Jesus restrict the ministerial priesthood to men? Jesus never gave reasons, just as he never revealed why he instituted the pastoral authority of the Twelve, or why he conferred the primacy upon Peter.

But Jesus did reveal in what direction our mind should proceed by emphasizing the link between his own priestly mission and that of his disciples: “As you sent me into the world, I have sent them into the world” (Jn 17:18). The sending of the Son by the Father is the foundation and model of the sending of the disciples on the part of Christ.

The similarity between the two missions is complemented by the fact that the disciples relate to Jesus as his representatives. Jesus willed that his disciples should act in his name and be his representatives. He conferred upon them a pastoral power in the image of his own and entrusted to them the task of celebrating the Eucharist in his name.

It follows that the assignment of the ministerial priesthood to males must be explained with reference to Christ himself and the mystery of the Incarna- tion. “Christ, who was distinct in that mystery, assumed a mission to which authority was attached to become the head of the Body.” Following the example of Christ, the priest is called upon to perform a role that calls for the exercise of authority and the embodiment of a relationship to Christ. He is called to lead the community as its shepherd and to do this in the name of Christ by representing the power that belongs to the Head of the Church. [32] The divine choice that once singled out the male gender for the Incarnation also assigns to this gender the priestly ministry. If the priesthood is restricted to – men, it is not, then, because of a casual decision predicated on contingencies, but because of an essential orientation built into the mystery of the Incarna- tion.

2. THE PROMOTION OF WOMAN’S MISSION IN THE CHURCH

The real issue is not whether women should have access to the priestly ministry but how the participation of women in ecclesial endeavors should be promoted. If Jesus restricted to males the pastoral ministry, it was for the sake of enabling women to carry out an ecciesial mission more suited to their personality and more productive. Therefore, the Church ought to favor this promotion of feminine activity which is an expression of the universal priesthood of the faithful.

The complementarity of the sexes is meant to express itself in the cooperation of women in the service of the Church. In the mystery of the Incarnation, a woman plays an indispensable role, a maternal role, in Jesus’ own coming to being here below. As mentioned, this maternal role has continued in the form of cooperation with Christ’s own work. It is exercised even now in the motherhood of Mary with respect to the Church. All this points out decisively the importance of woman’s mission carried out in keeping with specific feminine capacities.

This complementarity was highlighted in a special way by the risen Christ when he entrusted a mission to Mary Magdalene. This gesture goes to show that the ministerial priesthood entrusted to the apostles should not be self-contained, and should not dispense with womanly cooperation. Nor does this priesthood bestow upon the male holders of it a wholesale primacy in the proclamation of the Good News. A woman was the first witness to the Resurrection and was given the mission to convey the first message of the Risen One.

We are dealing, then, with a reciprocal complementarity based on priorities which intersect and complement each other. In order to be integrally translated into practice, this complementarity would have to bring about the abrogation of all inequities, of anything that still bespeaks inferiority for women, and of all the prejudices that make it more difficult for men and women to work together. It should also seek to establish the conditions which will stimulate the manifold resources of the feminine personality to devote themselves to the service of the Church.

Not only is it important not to identify the Church with the hierarchical authority, but we must also, in a concrete way, promote the spontaneity and originality women are called upon to contribute toward the Church’s unfolding through activities in which women’s initiative and ways are affirmed in cooperation with the ministerial priesthood.

Some have suggested the establishment of a diaconate for women. [33] Since such a diaconate existed once in the Eastern Church, no obstacle on the part of Church tradition precludes its establishment now. [34] However, even in the early centuries, the empowerment of deaconesses was not on a par with that of deacons. Deaconesses were the lowest rank in the clergy. Hence, this ecclesial office could hardly have been looked upon at that time as a recognition of woman’s dignity. A similar problem would arise today. The feminine diaconate would, on the one hand, convey the impression that women may travel along the road that leads to the sacrament of holy orders, and on the other, it would emphasize even more forcefully the fact that the presbyterate lies beyond their reach. Besides, why “clericalize” women by escorting them into the clergy? [35] If we follow this road, we are unlikely to promote authentically the mission of women in the Church. Once more, we would be looking for a way of letting the mission of the woman look like that of the man.

The data in the gospels that reveal Christ’s intention rather invite the Church to enlist women in the exercise of a mission that is consistent with a woman’s personality and so favors the respect and the appreciation of the difference.

ENDNOTES:

[31] In his reaction against the decision taken by the Episcopal Church in the U.S.A., the Anglican theologian E. L. Mascall emphasizes the theological nature of the issue. He notes that our task is to ascertain whether the Christian religion be a reality revealed by God through his incarnate Son, who requires an obedient fidelity to him, or whether it be a reality we are entitled to build according to our own specifications, by the use of democratic procedures and majority vote, in accordance with our own desires and the pressures exerted by contemporary society (“Some Basic Considerations”, in Man, Woman, Priesthood, p. 26).

[32] Hopko draws a comparison with the divine persons. To claim that women are discriminated against because they are excluded from ordination is as much as saying that the Holy Spirit is a victim of discrimination because he is not the Logos and God’s Son (“On the Male Character”, St. Vladimir’s Theological Quarterly [1975J: ’70). It is certain that the equality of the sexes and the difference between them derive first and foremost from the equality and difference which mark the divine persons. The human community has been fashioned as the image of the divine community.

[33] The appropriateness seems to be grounded on Jesus’ quality as Head rather than as Spouse. To respond to the objection that the priest acts in the name of the Church, the Bride, the Declaration Inter insignia emphasizes that the priest acts in the name of Christ the Head of the Church, and that it is because of this that he represents the Church in his priestly action. In conclusion, headship is the specific characteristic of the priestly ministry. It is this quality that warrants the assignment of the priesthood to males.

[34] Cf. Effort diaconal: Ordination des femmes au diaconat (Jan. -June 1974); B. Weiss, “Zum Diakonat der Frau”, TTZ 84 (1975): 14-27; F. Corrigan, “The Deaconess: Past and Future”, Clergy Review 62 (1977): 474-80.

[35] Cf. Gryson, Le Ministère des femmes, p. ii: “From a doctrinal viewpoint, it is perfectly conceivable that women could be entrusted with a ministry of a diaconal type. This was done in the Church for many centuries, and no doctrinal issue ensued.”

Mock Vestment: First U.K. Catholic Woman Priest — video

‘Can wrong be right?’

Body Language — Wringing hands; rubbing fingers: Nervousness; anxiety; uncertainty. Subconscious scrubbing away sin…

 

Catholic Truth Scotland has its combox open on the subject of their first U.K. Woman Priest. Here’s one insightful comment I snatched off the blog from Stuart:

“This organization claims that in the early Church, deaconesses were ordained well have a look at this quote ladies….

“Similarly, in regard to the deaconesses, as with all who are enrolled in the register, the same procedure is to be observed. We have made mention of the deaconesses, who have been enrolled in this position, although, not having been in any way ordained, they are certainly to be numbered among the laity” (Council of Nicea. Canon 19 [A.D. 325]).””

END OF POST/CONTINUAL PRAYER FOR THESE…

RCWP — Diocese of Venice, Florida: First ever excommunication for liturgical dance?

 “Those who excommunicate themselves must publicly repent.”

BreakingofBread

This from the Diocese of Venice statement concerning attempted ordinations by Roman Catholic Womenpriests:

Q7: What are the consequences for those participating in this event?

Those who take part within the ceremony in any manner, as an immediate and direct consequence of their own actions, separate themselves from the Catholic Church by automatic excommunication. Especially grave, and beyond the usual paths of public repentance, conversion and forgiveness, are those instances in which really bad and awkward liturgical dance is admitted causing further harm and division within the community and greater public scandal.

For instance:

 Okay. I may have touched up the statement a bit…

The actual statement from the diocese regarding “attempted ordinations” (I like how all the statements I’ve seen on the subject these days, and from whatever diocese, uses these very same words…”attempted ordinations”). For more of the story click here and here.

Diocese of Venice in Florida Statement Regarding Those Involved in Attempted Ordinations

It has come to the attention of Officials of the Diocese of Venice in Florida that advertisements attributed to an organization known as “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” have appeared regarding a purported attempt to “ordain” women to the ministerial priesthood here in Sarasota.

The Catholic Church has always taught that the Church has no authority to confer priestly ordination on women. The Church shares this teaching with our Orthodox Christian brothers and sisters. The ministerial priesthood is a gift from God, not something that someone “earns,” “deserves” or has a “right” to, due to advanced education, devoted service in the Church, or simply because of one’s own personal desire.

In calling only men as His Apostles, Christ acted in a completely free and sovereign manner. Throughout His earthly ministry, Our Lord also emphasized the dignity and the vocation of women, and in so doing, did not conform to the prevailing customs, traditions, and legislation of the time. Still, among His twelve Apostles, Jesus Christ did not include any women.

Sacred Scripture further reveals that Jesus did include the participation of women in His public ministry in ways that shows a differentiation of roles between men and women.  Together both worked to build up the unity of the Church, avoiding divisiveness.  Specific to the role of women, the Church gives thanks for the feminine “genius”, appearing in the course of history, in the midst of all peoples and nations, and for the charisms of the Holy Spirit on women’s manifestations of faith, hope and love. However, the attempt to “ordain” women by the organization titled “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” brings division, and fractures unity in the Church.

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith has issued a General Decree stating that those who attempt to confer Holy Orders on a woman, and women who attempt to receive Holy Orders, incur automatic excommunication. Excommunication is knowingly and willingly to place oneself outside the communion of the Catholic Church.

This statement is issued out of pastoral and spiritual concern for those who present themselves for such an invalid ritual, those who conduct it, and those who are direct participants, since their actions place them outside the Church.

This situation is sad for the entire Church. The Diocese prays that all those involved in this attempt to “ordain”, “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” will be reconciled with the Church, and that the harm and division caused will be healed, with the help of God’s grace.

Questions and Answers Regarding Attempted Ordinations of “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” in Sarasota on February 6, 2010

Q1: Why is the Diocese issuing this statement?

This statement is issued out of pastoral and spiritual concern for the faithful of our Diocese, and to provide clarity on the Catholic Church’s position regarding ordination to the ministerial priesthood. Further, the Diocese notes that the organization titled “Roman Catholic Womenpriests”, and those supporting this organization, are not in keeping with the Roman Catholic law on ordination to the ministerial priesthood.

Q2: What is the Church’s stand on the ordination of women?

A. In the apostolic letter Ordinatio Sacerdotalis, Pope John Paul II affirmed that the Catholic Church has no authority to confer priestly ordination on women. The Catholic Church shares this teaching with our Orthodox Christian brothers and sisters. The Church holds that this teaching, handed down by Christ through His Apostles, is definitive and cannot be changed.

In calling only men as His Apostles, Christ acted in a completely free and sovereign manner. That being said, throughout His earthly ministry, Our Lord also continually emphasized the dignity and the vocation of women, and in so doing, did not conform to the prevailing customs, traditions, and legislation of the time. Still, among His twelve Apostles, Jesus Christ did not include any women.

Q3: What are the essential elements of the teaching of the Catholic Church on the attempted “ordination” of women?

A. Ordination to the ministerial priesthood must be conferred by a validly ordained bishop on a baptized man. A candidate must receive the authorization of the Church, which has the authority and responsibility to determine if a true call to the priesthood exists for the said candidate.

The Catholic Church teaches that the Church does not have the authority to “ordain” women. The reasons for this include: the example recorded in sacred Scripture of Christ choosing His Apostles; the constant practice of the Church, which imitated Christ in choosing only men; and the Church’s living teaching authority.

Q4: What is the difference between the “common priesthood of believers” (royal priesthood), and the “ministerial priesthood”?

A. Through the Sacrament of Baptism, all Christians, both men and women, share equally in the “common priesthood of believers.” Through the Sacrament of Holy Orders, priests also share in the “ministerial priesthood” of Christ, the High Priest.

No individual has the “right” to be ordained to the ministerial priesthood. Only a baptized man whom the Bishop discerns to have a vocation and calls to ordination, may receive the Sacrament of Holy Orders, and thus share in the ministerial priesthood of Jesus Christ.

In the Catholic Church, a priest is ordained in the person of Christ. The priest becomes a literal “icon” of Jesus Christ as he ministers in the person of Christ, which among many things, necessarily includes the reality of his manhood.

Q5: Can Catholics attend this attempted “ordination” or any other simulation of a Sacrament?

A. Attendance at or direct participation in any simulation of a Sacrament is strictly forbidden. Among the reasons for this is the fact that such participation sows discord and fractures unity in the Church.

Q6: What constitutes “participation” in this event?

A. The women conducting the ceremony and claiming to be bishops, and the women who present themselves for “ordination” are the direct participants. Those who, through their presence at the ceremony, encourage division and openly defy Church teaching and discipline are also considered to be direct participants.

Q7: What are the consequences for those participating in this event?

Those who take part in the ceremony, as an immediate and direct consequence of their own actions, separate themselves from the Catholic Church by automatic excommunication.

Excommunication is knowingly and willingly to place oneself outside the Catholic Church. It is the most serious penalty that the Church recognizes, reserved for the most grave offenses a person commits. It results in a loss of the right to the Sacraments and the spiritual benefits shared by members of the Catholic Church.

Q8: Is excommunication final, or can the individuals come back to the Church?

A. Excommunication is a medicinal rather than a vindictive penalty, intended not so much to punish the person, as to correct him or her and bring the individual back to reconciliation with the Church.

Those who excommunicate themselves must publicly repent, make amends for the offense that they committed, and reunite themselves with the doctrine and practice of the Catholic Church. Again, remember it is through one’s own conscious and deliberate actions that excommunication takes place. Further, for those attempting to confer Holy Orders and for those women seeking the same, this reconciliation must come through the Holy See in Rome.

The Diocese prays that all those involved in this attempt to “ordain”, “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” will be reconciled with the Church, and that the harm and division caused will be healed, with the help of God’s grace.

Diocese of Venice in Florida Statement Regarding Those Involved in Attempted Ordinations – NBC-2.com WBBH News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral & Naples, Florida

END OF POST

Sign The Petition! Unqualified acceptance of Vatican II

“Many people have signed a petition for the unqualified acceptance of the council [Vatican II]. Right from the start, the expression “unqualified acceptance” irritates me because I don’t know anyone—myself included—to whom it would apply…”

 Bishop Kurt Koch
Roses from Heaven for His Excellency Bishop Kurt Koch

What moves me?

More honesty please!

In the last few weeks a lot of journalists, and also some clergy, have been expressing their opinions of Pope Benedict. In these opinions were also contained many half-truths, untruths, and slanders. The worst accusation asserts that the Pope wishes to go back to before the Second Vatican Council. This accusation is the worst because it implies that the very person who possesses the teaching authority of the universal Church would work to undermine the authority of the council. This verdict, however, would be completely mistaken. As a young theologian, in fact, Benedict XVI contributed very much to the council. Anyone who seeks to understand the Pope now—not just from the media—but also by reading what he writes, would come to the conclusion that he has oriented his entire magisterium on the council. How should we then understand the accusation being made?

Many people have signed a petition for the unqualified acceptance of the council. Right from the start, the expression “unqualified acceptance” irritates me because I don’t know anyone—myself included—to whom it would apply. A few arbitrarily chosen examples will suffice:

– The council did not abolish Latin in the liturgy. On the contrary, it emphasized that in the Roman Rite, apart from exceptional cases, the use of the Latin language must be maintained. Who among the vocal defenders of the council wishes “unqualified acceptance” of that?

– The council declared that the Church regards Gregorian Chant as the “music proper to the Roman Rite”, and that it must therefore “be given primary place.” In how many parishes is this implemented “without qualification?”

– The council expressly requested that governmental authorities voluntarily give up those rights to participation in the selection of bishops, that had arisen over the course of time. Which defender of the council advocates “without qualification” for that?

– The council described the fundamental nature of the liturgy as the celebration the pascal mystery and the eucharistic sacrifice as “the completion of the work of our salvation.” How can that be reconciled with my experience, made in many different parishes, that the sacrificial understanding of the Mass has been completely eliminated from the liturgical language and the Mass is now understood only as a meal or “the breaking of bread?” In what way can one justify this profound change by reference to the council?

– No office of the Church was given more significance by the council that that of bishop. How can we then understand the widespread diminishment in Switzerland of this office of the Church, which is justified by reference to the council? When, for example, Hans Kung denies completely the teaching authority of the bishops, allowing them only the office of pastoral leadership?

It would not be difficult to lengthen this litany. Even so, it should be obvious why I demand more honesty in the current debate about the council. Instead of accusing others, and even the Pope, of wishing to go back to before the council, everyone would be well advised to look over their own books and reassess their own personal position on the council. Because not everything that was said and done after the council, was therefore done in accordance with the council—and that applies also to the diocese of Basel. In any case, the last few weeks have illustrated to me that a primary problem in the current situation has been a very poor, and in part very one-sided understanding and acceptance of the council, even by Catholics that defend the council “without qualification.” In this regard we all—once more including myself—have a lot of ground to make up. Therefore I again repeat my urgent request: More honesty please!

+ Kurt Koch

Bishop of Basel

Ed. Note: Every Catholic in America needs to read this locution; and sign the petition… [To read the documents of VII!]

H/T WDTPRS: Read Fr. Z’s comments

Cardinal Regali: “It is most unfortunate that this pseudo-ordination has occurred within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia,” (Full Text)

Self Excommunication in Philadelphia…

Cardinal Justin Regali
Cardinal Justin Regali

The Bulletin

An invalid ordination that tried to make two women Catholic priests has spurred a strong reaction from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the form of an open letter from Cardinal Justin Rigali.

The ordination ceremony, which took place on Sunday with a bishop from a group called Roman Catholic Womenpriests (RCWP), took place at a Christian chapel inside Congregation Mishkan Shalom, a Reconstructionist Jewish synagogue in Philadelphia. It was the first such invalid ordination of women to occur in the Philadelphia archdiocese.

celebrating_mass_11-2“It is most unfortunate that this pseudo-ordination has occurred within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia,” said Cardinal Rigali. “I am concerned pastorally for the souls of those involved and for the Catholic faithful who may be confused. Those who present themselves for ordination at such an invalid ceremony – as well as those who falsely claim to be ordaining the women – are, by their actions, automatically excommunicated from the Church.”

While a push to ordain women has subsided since its height years ago, it is still a goal for some feminists in various countries. The Catholic Church has closed the book on any discussions about women joining the priesthood, saying the Church lacks the power to change the matter. Cardinal Rigali said that the reason for this is that the Church draws on scripture and sacred tradition, two sources that are not negotiable.

“Both clearly indicate that Jesus called only men to follow him as apostles, and the Church has always regarded his choice in this matter as normative for all time,” said Cardinal Rigali. “Therefore, she has always followed Jesus’ example by choosing only men for the ministry of Holy Orders. This teaching has been confirmed by the supreme authority of the Catholic Church as definitive and irreformable. Consequently, the Church is not authorized by Christ to confer holy orders upon women, and cannot do so, no matter how ardent a person’s desire may be.” Read The Full Story

Full Text Follows:

STATEMENT FROM CARDINAL JUSTIN RIGALI 

ON THE INVALID CEREMONY OF THE ORDINATION OF WOMEN IN PHILADELPHIA

It is most unfortunate that this pseudo-Ordination has occurred within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. I am concerned pastorally for the souls of those involved and for the Catholic faithful who may be confused. Those who present themselves for ordination at such an invalid ceremony – as well as those who falsely claim to be ordaining the women — are, by their actions, automatically excommunicated from the Church. (General Decree regarding the delict of attempted sacred ordination of a woman, Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, December 19, 2007) 

Such a ceremony is in violation of the constant teaching of the Church, based on Scripture and Sacred Tradition. Both clearly indicate that Jesus called only men to follow Him as Apostles, and the Church has always regarded his choice in this matter as normative for all time. Therefore, she has always followed Jesus’ example by choosing only men for the ministry of Holy Orders. This teaching has been confirmed by the supreme authority of the Catholic Church as definitive and irreformable. Consequently, the Church is not authorized by Christ to confer Holy Orders upon women, and cannot do so, no matter how ardent a person’s desire may be. 

All Catholic men and women bring different yet equally valuable gifts to the Church. The Church is strongest when the gifts given by Christ to all her members are celebrated and respected. Our late Holy Father, Pope John Paul II, said, “The presence and the role of women in the life of the Church, although not linked to the ministerial priesthood, remain absolutely necessary and irreplaceable.” (Ordinatio Sacerdotalis, 1994). 

God’s gifts, however, are never given to individuals merely for their own fulfillment, but for the unfolding of his plan of salvation in the Church for the benefit of the whole community of the faithful, and no one’s true personal dignity in the Church can be fostered in opposition to the will of Christ Himself. Consequently, such a pseudo-ordination ceremony denigrates the truth entrusted to the Church by Christ Himself, and demonstrates a complete misunderstanding of the respect and dignity accorded to women by Christ and His Church.

Notre Dame Formation: Two of Four Phony Catholic Women Bishops “Newly Ordained” Are Alums

000_img_0046_2

The Bishop’s staff is called a Crozier and it represents the Bishop as the Good Shepherd. Jesus, of course, is the Good Shepherd and is the model Shepherd for all the Apostles and their following successors. The croziers in this case (dripping with irony) resemble big question marks… If excommunication was not such a serious matter the photo would be laughable. Dana Reynolds pictured above (second from left) the first non-bishop woman in America, was joined by four more previously self-excommunicated lay women in Santa Barbara, California, this weekend. 

For the sake of your spiritual life, avoid these groups…

Along with the Obamarama spectacle, sponsorship of pro-homosexual event activities during Holy Week, the University of Notre Dame, and nearby St. Mary’s, can also proudly boast today that two women alums now consider themselves Roman Catholic Bishops.

Ray Grosswirth, national media liaison for CORPUS released this yesterday on his blog:

Meehan
Meehan

PRESS RELEASE 
April 20, 2009
CORPUS SUPPORTS AND CONGRATULATES FOUR NEWLY-ORDAINED CATHOLIC WOMEN-BISHOPS

CORPUS (www.corpus.org), the national association for an inclusive priesthood, is deeply proud to articulate its support of four ordinations that took place on April 19 in the state of California. It is with great joy that we congratulate the following four Catholic bishops: Joan Mary Clark Houk, Andrea Michele Johnson, Bridget Mary Meehan and Maria Regina Nicolosi.

Regina
Regina

Bishops Houk, Johnson, Meehan and Nicolosi join their male counterparts in the Roman Catholic Episcopate as servant-leaders of their respective communities. […]

 

 

In honor of these sad times, here’s the ND lineup and victory march:

The Notre Dame Victory March

Johnson
Johnson

Rally sons of Notre Dame,
Sing her glory, and sound her fame
Raise her Gold and Blue,
And cheer with voices true,
Rah! Rah! For Notre Dame.We will fight in every game
Strong of heart and true to her name.

We will ne’er forget her
And we’ll cheer her ever,
Loyal to Notre Dame.

Chorus:

Houk
Houk

Cheer, cheer for Old Notre Dame
Wake up the echoes cheering her name,
Send the volley cheer on high,
Shake down the thunder from the sky,What though the odds be great or small
Old Notre Dame will win over all,
While her loyal sons are marching
Onward to Victory.

From The Editor:

Note also that both groups, CORPUS and Roman Catholic Women Priests, are members of the American Catholic Council…

Columnist Judy Bowman on Women in the Priesthood

Editors Note: This fine article written by Judy Bowman on June 18th is by far one of the best I’ve discovered on the issue of women’s ordination within the Catholic Church. Along with Judy, we pray that the Holy Spirit will enlighten the hearts of those women (and men) currently excommunicated opening the door to their swift return to Holy Mother Church…

Judy Bowman, Catoosa County News

Just three weeks ago, the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued a Decree of Excommunication. This isn’t something that happens every day. Excommunication is a serious action, which impedes the reception of the Church’s Sacraments in cases of particularly grave or serious sin (Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraph 1463). In this recent case, the Church excommunicated people involved in attempting the “ordination” of women as priests of the Roman Catholic Church.

God loves women. He chose a woman to bring Salvation to the world through Mary, the mother of God. Women have played important roles in the Church since the early days of Christ’s public ministry. Jesus went against the Jewish norms of His day by involving women publicly in His life on earth, as His cherished friends. It was Mary of Magdala who was chosen by God to be the first person to see the risen Christ and to spread that good news to His loved ones. Nearly all of the non-Jewish religions of Christ’s day had female priestesses, so choosing women for this role in His Church would have been socially-acceptable, especially in ministering to the Gentiles. But He didn’t choose women to be priests. He chose only men. Through these 12 men, a direct line of Apostolic succession has remained in the Catholic Church until today.

God doesn’t make mistakes. He came to save us through Christ at a precise moment in history and through the exact people He had chosen as His own. The priestly tradition of the Jews, a male tradition, was part of His salvation plan from the beginning of time. The passover lamb of the Jews, always a male, prefigured the role of Christ as the Paschal Lamb and perfect Sacrifice. Jesus is the Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the world. The argument is sometimes made that, if Christ were alive today, He would choose women for the priesthood. Here’s a news flash, Christ IS alive today. He comes to us at every Mass when He becomes for us, the Bread of Life. He lives and acts in His church, who has taught from the time of the Apostles that the priesthood is a Sacrament reserved only for baptized men (Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraph 1577).

Each Sacrament established by Christ has two elements, form and matter. The form of the Sacrament is the way in which it is enacted. For Baptism, the “form” is the words used to baptize “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” The “matter” of Baptism is water. In the Holy Eucharist, the “form” is the words of consecration spoken by the priest when he echoes the words used by Jesus at the Last Supper in the breaking of the bread and the offering of the cup. The “matter” of the Eucharist is the wheat bread and the grape wine. When someone is ordained to the priesthood, the “form” of the Sacrament is the bishop’s laying on of his hands onto the man desiring ordination. The “matter” of the Sacrament is the man himself, who has responded to God’s call of service as a priest. Just as the Church could never substitute something else for the bread and wine used in the Holy Eucharist, or for the water used in Baptism, the Church can never allow the “ordination” of women. The “matter” of this Sacrament is, and always must be, male. The Pope himself can never allow women to be priests. “I declare that the Church has no authority whatsoever to confer priestly ordination on women and that this judgment is to be definitively held by all the Church’s faithful” (Pope John Paul II, 05-22-94).

This is not an issue of justice. It’s not unjust that men can’t give birth to babies. It’s a gift reserved for women. Likewise, it’s not unjust that women can’t be ordained. It’s a Sacrament reserved for men. No one has a “right” to the priesthood. Men are called by God Himself to this life. In Jesus’ humanity, He was a man. His gender was not an accident, because the Church is His bride. The priest reflects Christ whenever he celebrates any of the Sacraments that Jesus gave us. Women generously serve the Church in many important roles every day, and have done so throughout history. There are different roles within the Body of Christ, as St. Paul tells us. Men and women are equal in the eyes of God, but this equality is not synonymous with sameness. What a boring Church that would be! God blesses us in our unique roles and we are called to embrace that uniqueness and celebrate our varied gifts and graces. We give Him glory when we are most fully ourselves in His service, whatever our role may be. And we pray that those who struggle with these roles, in any way, may experience the love and guidance of the Holy Spirit in their lives and may return to full communion with His Church.