Tag Archives: Excommunication

Ordain A Lady: One small step (back) for women, one giant leap for moonbats…

…It only makes sense in view of the fact that the Women’s Ordination Conference would, ‘beg, borrow, and steal’ from an idol.

And lest any soul believe that the church discriminates or disrespects the dignity of Catholic women in forbidding their ordination, here is why it doesn’t: ORDINATIO SACERDOTALIS, Pope John Paul II

HAT TIP/ Acts of the Apostasy — Okay, I can’t hold it any longer…Bwahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah… .. .

Call To Action Sends e-Card to God, Bishop’s should reply on behalf of God

In 2006 the Vatican confirmed Bishop Fabian Bruskewitz‘s 1996 decision to excommunicate members of the dissident group Call to Action. Unfortunately, the excommunication order applied only within the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska.

I say “unfortunately” because the e-card to God above proves, yet again, that Call To Action continues to endanger souls, (not the least their own), and that the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) should act as one body to apply the same disciplinary actions nationwide as was done in the Diocese of Lincoln.

At that time Cardinal Giovanni Battista Re, prefect of the Congregation for Bishops, stated within the confirmation letter to Bruskewitz that Call To Action is “causing damage to the Church of Christ”, and that, “the activities of ‘Call to Action’ in the course of these years are in contrast with the Catholic Faith due to views and positions held which are unacceptable from a doctrinal and disciplinary standpoint.”  Re further pointed out in his closing remarks, that “to be a member of this Association or to support it, is irreconcilable with a coherent living of the Catholic Faith.” Thereby upholding Bruskewitz’s own judgement and decision that Call To Action is “totally incompatible with the Catholic faith”. And so, the disciplinary action was deemed “properly taken.”

So, what about Call To Action today?

Causing damage to the Church of Christ?

Check…

Activities of Call To Action in contrast with the Catholic faith?

Check…

Views and positions unacceptable from a doctrinal and disciplinary standpoint?

Check…

Irreconcilable with a coherent living of the Catholic Faith?

Check…

Totally incompatible with the Catholic faith?

See above.

As I write, the church is fighting the culture of death for the sake of religious freedom in America, 100% of bishops who head dioceses have spoken out against the  odious Obama/HHS mandate.

A mandate supported by Call To Action. 

Hopefully, Bishop’s will soon realize that any well-coordinated defense of the Catholic Church from such outside forces must necessarily include defense of the faith from those posing to be inside, and act.

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Vatican Clarification Statement: Episcopal Ordination in the Diocese of Shantou

 Joseph Huang Bingzhang

Episcopal Ordination in the Diocese of Shantou
(Province of Guangdong, Mainland China)

The following clarifications are issued with reference to the episcopal ordination of the Reverend Joseph Huang Bingzhang which took place on Thursday, 14 July 2011:

1) The Reverend Joseph Huang Bingzhang, having been ordained without papal mandate and hence illicitly, has incurred the sanctions laid down by canon 1382 of the Code of Canon Law. Consequently, the Holy See does not recognize him as Bishop of the Diocese of Shantou, and he lacks authority to govern the Catholic community of the Diocese.
The Reverend Huang Bingzhang had been informed some time ago that he could not be approved by the Holy See as an episcopal candidate, inasmuch as the Diocese of Shantou already has a legitimate Bishop; Reverend Huang had been asked on numerous occasions not to accept episcopal ordination.

2) From various sources the Holy See had knowledge of the fact that some Bishops, contacted by the civil authorities, had expressed their unwillingness to take part in an illicit ordination and also offered various forms of resistance, yet were reportedly obliged to take part in the ordination.
With regard to this resistance, it should be noted that it is meritorious before God and calls for appreciation on the part of the whole Church. Equal appreciation is also due to those priests, consecrated persons and members of the faithful who have defended their pastors, accompanying them by their prayers at this difficult time and sharing in their deep suffering.

3) The Holy See reaffirms the right of Chinese Catholics to be able to act freely, following their consciences and remaining faithful to the Successor of Peter and in communion with the universal Church.
The Holy Father, having learned of these events, once again deplores the manner in which the Church in China is being treated and hopes that the present difficulties can be overcome as soon as possible.

From the Vatican, 16 July 2011

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Mock Vestment: First U.K. Catholic Woman Priest — video

‘Can wrong be right?’

Body Language — Wringing hands; rubbing fingers: Nervousness; anxiety; uncertainty. Subconscious scrubbing away sin…

 

Catholic Truth Scotland has its combox open on the subject of their first U.K. Woman Priest. Here’s one insightful comment I snatched off the blog from Stuart:

“This organization claims that in the early Church, deaconesses were ordained well have a look at this quote ladies….

“Similarly, in regard to the deaconesses, as with all who are enrolled in the register, the same procedure is to be observed. We have made mention of the deaconesses, who have been enrolled in this position, although, not having been in any way ordained, they are certainly to be numbered among the laity” (Council of Nicea. Canon 19 [A.D. 325]).””

END OF POST/CONTINUAL PRAYER FOR THESE…

RCWP — Diocese of Venice, Florida: First ever excommunication for liturgical dance?

 “Those who excommunicate themselves must publicly repent.”

BreakingofBread

This from the Diocese of Venice statement concerning attempted ordinations by Roman Catholic Womenpriests:

Q7: What are the consequences for those participating in this event?

Those who take part within the ceremony in any manner, as an immediate and direct consequence of their own actions, separate themselves from the Catholic Church by automatic excommunication. Especially grave, and beyond the usual paths of public repentance, conversion and forgiveness, are those instances in which really bad and awkward liturgical dance is admitted causing further harm and division within the community and greater public scandal.

For instance:

 Okay. I may have touched up the statement a bit…

The actual statement from the diocese regarding “attempted ordinations” (I like how all the statements I’ve seen on the subject these days, and from whatever diocese, uses these very same words…”attempted ordinations”). For more of the story click here and here.

Diocese of Venice in Florida Statement Regarding Those Involved in Attempted Ordinations

It has come to the attention of Officials of the Diocese of Venice in Florida that advertisements attributed to an organization known as “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” have appeared regarding a purported attempt to “ordain” women to the ministerial priesthood here in Sarasota.

The Catholic Church has always taught that the Church has no authority to confer priestly ordination on women. The Church shares this teaching with our Orthodox Christian brothers and sisters. The ministerial priesthood is a gift from God, not something that someone “earns,” “deserves” or has a “right” to, due to advanced education, devoted service in the Church, or simply because of one’s own personal desire.

In calling only men as His Apostles, Christ acted in a completely free and sovereign manner. Throughout His earthly ministry, Our Lord also emphasized the dignity and the vocation of women, and in so doing, did not conform to the prevailing customs, traditions, and legislation of the time. Still, among His twelve Apostles, Jesus Christ did not include any women.

Sacred Scripture further reveals that Jesus did include the participation of women in His public ministry in ways that shows a differentiation of roles between men and women.  Together both worked to build up the unity of the Church, avoiding divisiveness.  Specific to the role of women, the Church gives thanks for the feminine “genius”, appearing in the course of history, in the midst of all peoples and nations, and for the charisms of the Holy Spirit on women’s manifestations of faith, hope and love. However, the attempt to “ordain” women by the organization titled “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” brings division, and fractures unity in the Church.

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith has issued a General Decree stating that those who attempt to confer Holy Orders on a woman, and women who attempt to receive Holy Orders, incur automatic excommunication. Excommunication is knowingly and willingly to place oneself outside the communion of the Catholic Church.

This statement is issued out of pastoral and spiritual concern for those who present themselves for such an invalid ritual, those who conduct it, and those who are direct participants, since their actions place them outside the Church.

This situation is sad for the entire Church. The Diocese prays that all those involved in this attempt to “ordain”, “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” will be reconciled with the Church, and that the harm and division caused will be healed, with the help of God’s grace.

Questions and Answers Regarding Attempted Ordinations of “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” in Sarasota on February 6, 2010

Q1: Why is the Diocese issuing this statement?

This statement is issued out of pastoral and spiritual concern for the faithful of our Diocese, and to provide clarity on the Catholic Church’s position regarding ordination to the ministerial priesthood. Further, the Diocese notes that the organization titled “Roman Catholic Womenpriests”, and those supporting this organization, are not in keeping with the Roman Catholic law on ordination to the ministerial priesthood.

Q2: What is the Church’s stand on the ordination of women?

A. In the apostolic letter Ordinatio Sacerdotalis, Pope John Paul II affirmed that the Catholic Church has no authority to confer priestly ordination on women. The Catholic Church shares this teaching with our Orthodox Christian brothers and sisters. The Church holds that this teaching, handed down by Christ through His Apostles, is definitive and cannot be changed.

In calling only men as His Apostles, Christ acted in a completely free and sovereign manner. That being said, throughout His earthly ministry, Our Lord also continually emphasized the dignity and the vocation of women, and in so doing, did not conform to the prevailing customs, traditions, and legislation of the time. Still, among His twelve Apostles, Jesus Christ did not include any women.

Q3: What are the essential elements of the teaching of the Catholic Church on the attempted “ordination” of women?

A. Ordination to the ministerial priesthood must be conferred by a validly ordained bishop on a baptized man. A candidate must receive the authorization of the Church, which has the authority and responsibility to determine if a true call to the priesthood exists for the said candidate.

The Catholic Church teaches that the Church does not have the authority to “ordain” women. The reasons for this include: the example recorded in sacred Scripture of Christ choosing His Apostles; the constant practice of the Church, which imitated Christ in choosing only men; and the Church’s living teaching authority.

Q4: What is the difference between the “common priesthood of believers” (royal priesthood), and the “ministerial priesthood”?

A. Through the Sacrament of Baptism, all Christians, both men and women, share equally in the “common priesthood of believers.” Through the Sacrament of Holy Orders, priests also share in the “ministerial priesthood” of Christ, the High Priest.

No individual has the “right” to be ordained to the ministerial priesthood. Only a baptized man whom the Bishop discerns to have a vocation and calls to ordination, may receive the Sacrament of Holy Orders, and thus share in the ministerial priesthood of Jesus Christ.

In the Catholic Church, a priest is ordained in the person of Christ. The priest becomes a literal “icon” of Jesus Christ as he ministers in the person of Christ, which among many things, necessarily includes the reality of his manhood.

Q5: Can Catholics attend this attempted “ordination” or any other simulation of a Sacrament?

A. Attendance at or direct participation in any simulation of a Sacrament is strictly forbidden. Among the reasons for this is the fact that such participation sows discord and fractures unity in the Church.

Q6: What constitutes “participation” in this event?

A. The women conducting the ceremony and claiming to be bishops, and the women who present themselves for “ordination” are the direct participants. Those who, through their presence at the ceremony, encourage division and openly defy Church teaching and discipline are also considered to be direct participants.

Q7: What are the consequences for those participating in this event?

Those who take part in the ceremony, as an immediate and direct consequence of their own actions, separate themselves from the Catholic Church by automatic excommunication.

Excommunication is knowingly and willingly to place oneself outside the Catholic Church. It is the most serious penalty that the Church recognizes, reserved for the most grave offenses a person commits. It results in a loss of the right to the Sacraments and the spiritual benefits shared by members of the Catholic Church.

Q8: Is excommunication final, or can the individuals come back to the Church?

A. Excommunication is a medicinal rather than a vindictive penalty, intended not so much to punish the person, as to correct him or her and bring the individual back to reconciliation with the Church.

Those who excommunicate themselves must publicly repent, make amends for the offense that they committed, and reunite themselves with the doctrine and practice of the Catholic Church. Again, remember it is through one’s own conscious and deliberate actions that excommunication takes place. Further, for those attempting to confer Holy Orders and for those women seeking the same, this reconciliation must come through the Holy See in Rome.

The Diocese prays that all those involved in this attempt to “ordain”, “Roman Catholic Womenpriests” will be reconciled with the Church, and that the harm and division caused will be healed, with the help of God’s grace.

Diocese of Venice in Florida Statement Regarding Those Involved in Attempted Ordinations – NBC-2.com WBBH News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral & Naples, Florida

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Waiting Room Conversation — ‘Mrs. Pelosi, Doctor Vasa will see you now.’

 

“When matters are serious and public, the Bishop may deem it necessary to declare that lack of communion explicitly. This declaration no more causes the excommunication than a doctor who diagnoses diabetes causes the diabetes he finds in his patient. The doctor recognizes the symptoms and writes the necessary prescription…”

ED. NOTE: Bishop Robert Vasa on Excommunication/Catholic Sentinel

Excommunication is a declaration of acts that severs ties

BEND — During the course of this past year there have been a number of occasions when bishops have hinted to laity that being Catholic involves a bit more than claiming the title. This has been done, in particular, with regard to politicians who may, in their own way, love Jesus, who may attend Sunday Mass and who do identify themselves as “faithful” Catholics. The press usually hints at the big “E” word, excommunication. The question of when a Catholic should be excommunicated has even been asked quite frequently and very seriously. While bishops are extremely reluctant to take the seemingly dramatic step of excommunication, I think there is very good reason for us to explore more thoroughly what excommunication really means and why it might be considered in certain circumstances.

The press would undoubtedly accuse Bishops who talk or even think about excommunication as being tyrannical power mongers but this is unfair. Excommunication is a declaration, based on solid evidence, that the actions or public teachings of a particular Catholic are categorically incompatible with the teachings of the Church. It is intended primarily as a means of getting the person who is in grave error to recognize the depth of his error and repent. A second reason, while somewhat secondary but no less important, is to assure the faithful who truly are faithful that what they believe to be the teaching of the Church is true and correct. Allowing their faith to be shaken or allowing them to be confused when Catholics publicly affirm something contrary to faith or morals, seemingly without consequences, scandalizes and confuses the faithful. This is no small matter. The Church, and particularly bishops, have an obligation to defend the faith but they also have an obligation to protect the faithful. We do not generally see the dissidence of public figures as something that harms the faithful but it has a deleterious effect upon them.

I find, very frequently, when I speak a bit more boldly on matters of morality or discipline, there are a significant number of the faithful who send messages of gratitude and support. It is their gratitude which stirs my heart for it makes me realize how much there is a need to support and affirm the clear and consistent teachings of our Catholic faith for the sake of the faithful. While the press may caricature such bishops in rather uncharitable fashion, I trust that they are men devoted to true compassion and to the truth itself. Their compassion extends to those who are misled and to those who, while not misled, are discouraged when their faith is attacked without rebuttal. This discouragement of the faithful is not insignificant. When we look at the word itself we see that its root is “courage” and allowing someone’s courage to be dissipated, or “dissed” as the young might say, is harmful to the person. En-couragement, by contrast, builds up the courage of the faithful and increases their strength for doing good. It is life giving and revitalizing. Allowing error, publicly expressed, to stand without comment or contradiction is discouraging.

When that moral error is espoused publicly by a Catholic who, by the likewise public and external act of receiving Holy Communion, appears to be in “good standing” then the faithful are doubly confused and doubly discouraged. In that case, the error is certainly not refuted. Furthermore, the impression is given that the error is positively condoned by the bishop and the Church. This is very dis-couraging to the faithful. In such a case, private “dialogue” is certainly appropriate but a public statement is also needed. In extreme cases, excommunication may be deemed necessary.

It seems to me that even if a decree of excommunication would be issued, the bishop would really not excommunicate anyone. He only declares that the person is excommunicated by virtue of the person’s own actions. The actions and words, contrary to faith and morals, are what excommunicate (i.e. break communion with the Church). When matters are serious and public, the Bishop may deem it necessary to declare that lack of communion explicitly. This declaration no more causes the excommunication than a doctor who diagnoses diabetes causes the diabetes he finds in his patient. The doctor recognizes the symptoms and writes the necessary prescription. Accusing the doctor of being a tyrannical power monger would never cross anyone’s mind. Even when the doctor tells the patient that they are “excommunicated” from sugar it is clear that his desire is solely the health of his patient. In fact, a doctor who told his diabetic patient that he could keep ingesting all the sugar he wanted without fear would be found grossly negligent and guilty of malpractice.

In the same way, bishops who recognize a serious spiritual malady and seek a prescription to remedy the error, after discussion and warning, may be required to simply state, “What you do and say is gravely wrong and puts you out of communion with the faith you claim to hold.” In serious cases, and the cases of misled Catholic public officials are often very serious, a declaration of the fact that the person is de facto out of communion may be the only responsible and charitable thing to do.

Failing to name error because of some kind of fear of offending the person in error is neither compassion nor charity. Confronting or challenging the error or evil of another is never easy yet it must be done.

The adage usually attributed to Edmund Burke was correct: All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.

The Lord has called bishops to be shepherds. That shepherding entails both leading and protecting. In an era when error runs rampant and false teachings abound, the voice of the Holy Father rings clear and true. The teachings of the Church are well documented and consistent. Bishops and the pastors who serve in their Dioceses have an obligation both to lead their people to the truth and protect them from error.

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