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Reaping the Whirlwind of Abortion

By Bishop Thomas G. Doran

The Observer, the Official Newspaper of the Catholic Diocese of Rockford, where it appeared in the August 11th issue.

I want to touch on this matter before we get too close to the November madness. As human beings, as citizens of a “first world country,” as Americans, and as Catholics, most importantly, we have to take count of the circumstances in which we live. We know that the only creatures of God that outlast time are those created having intellect and will. All other things, with the passage of time, break up or break down.

Many of the issues that confront us are serious, and we know by now that the political parties in our country are at loggerheads as to how to solve them. We know, for instance, that adherents of one political party would place us squarely on the road to suicide as a people.

The seven “sacraments” of their secular culture are abortion, buggery, contraception, divorce, euthanasia, feminism of the radical type, and genetic experimentation and mutilation. These things they unabashedly espouse, profess and promote. Their continuance in public office is a clear and present danger to our survival as a nation.

Since the mid-1940s we have been accustomed to look askance at Germans. They were protagonists of the Second World War and so responsible for fifty million deaths. We say, “How awful,” and yet in our country we have, for the most part, allowed the party of death and the court system it has produced to eliminate, since 1973, upwards of forty million of our fellow citizens without allowing them to see the light of day.

They have done their best to make ours a true culture of death. No doubt, we shall soon outstrip the Nazis in doing human beings to death.

I do not think that we should spend a great deal of time in lamentation over the children whose lives have been snuffed out by the barbaric practice of therapeutic abortion. They passed from their lives quickly in this world and have gone into the hands of the Lord of Life and Mercy for all eternity. We must make it clear too, that many who have sought to have practiced on themselves therapeutic abortion are in many instances driven to it by persons heedless of their welfare, or by well- meaning but inept parents or guardians who regard abortion as a solution and not as what it is – an immense problem. There are some, I think few, largely given over to immoral lives who regard abortion as a good, but their number is not great.

What we have to remember is that violence breeds violence. When we tolerate unjust attacks upon the tiniest innocents among us, we habituate ourselves to violence. And so we have allowed these barbaric practices to corrupt our laws, our medical practice, and even our ordinary lives. How accustomed we have become to the immense loss of life in our wars throughout the world! Those who have killed millions under their mother’s hearts cannot be expected to balk at a mere few thousand killed in Afghanistan, in Iraq, in Somalia, in Darfur, in Bosnia, in Madrid, in London, in Baghdad, in Beirut, in Washington, in New York. The violence of abortion coarsens the lives of all of us.

Once it was said, “… for all who take the sword will perish by the sword.” (Matthew 26:52) So we see the rise in the number of predations among youth, even among the youngest, the rise of domestic violence. We speak of road rage as a common thing. It is true what the theologians have said, that sin darkens the intellect, and weakens the will. Having sown the wind of abortion we now reap the whirlwind. This appears in every quarter of our culture and on every day. And that just from the first of the “sacraments of death” of our secular human culture.

The toleration of sexual perversions among inverts, widespread contraception, easy access to “no fault” divorce, the killing of the elderly, radical feminism, embryonic stem cell research – all of these things defile and debase our human nature and our human destiny. Should we cry out with the prophet “To the mountains, ‘Cover us,’ and to the hills, ‘Fall on us'” (Hosea: 10:8), lest other peoples see and, God forbid, imitate us?

I ran across, in one parish, prayers of the faithful with the intention that “we pray for those who work and demonstrate for the cause of life and the unborn, the aged and the defected, that they may persevere in spite of the ridicule they receive sometimes, even from pastors and priests.” I shudder to think that might be true. We know from the sad experience of recent years that some Catholics (even among priests) are so warped and perverted from their Catholic vocation, that they are capable of enormities. But, they should know that it was no prelate or bishop or pope that said, “Suffer the little children to come to me and do not hinder them” (Matthew 19:14). The Invisible Head of the Church will one day come to judge the living and the dead and the world by fire, particularly those who have either by acts of omission or commission, destroyed innocent human life.

It is the duty of every Catholic to support the work of the parish Pro-Life directors and commissions and to work for the extirpation from our society of all those who in any way foster or promote these things. I wholeheartedly endorse the activities of our Pro-Life Office in the sure and certain knowledge that divine justice will not allow those who act against human life to prosper. These unholy sacraments of our secular culture are the seeds of the destruction of our nation.

Think for yourself: what nation that kills its young, perverts marriage, prevents new life, and destroys the family, kills those deemed useless, makes the war of the sexes into a real war, and manipulates the genetic basis of human nature, can long endure?

Pope Benedict XVI’ Warns of Weapons of Mass Destruction in the Hands of Terrorists

VATICAN CITY – Pope Benedict urged the world Monday to prevent terrorists from getting their hands on weapons of mass destruction.

In an annual speech to Vatican-based diplomats outlining the Holy See’s foreign policy priorities, Benedict also called for continued diplomatic efforts over Iran’s nuclear program.

“I wish to urge the international community to make a global commitment on security,” he said.

“A joint effort on the part of states to implement all the obligations undertaken and to prevent terrorists from gaining access to weapons of mass destruction would undoubtedly strengthen the nuclear non-proliferation regime and make it more effective.” The Pope backed continuing negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program, which the U.S. and it allies fear is aimed at building atomic weapons. Tehran insists its nuclear program is peaceful.

“I should also like to express my support for continued and uninterrupted pursuit of the path of diplomacy in order to resolve the issue of Iran’s nuclear program, by negotiating in good faith, adopting measures designed to increase transparency and mutual trust,” he said.

There has been speculation that the United States or Israel might launch a military strike against Iran.

Benedict also told the foreign ambassadors that measures must be taken to reduce conventional weapons and to deal with the humanitarian problems caused by cluster weapons.

Cluster bombs open in flight and scatter dozens of bomblets, some of which fail to explode and pose a risk to civilians even after a conflict has ended.

In his speech, the Pope also condemned the frequent attacks suffered by Iraq’s Christian community, saying the country needs to undertake a constitutional reform that will safeguard the rights of minorities.

Benedict touched on many of the world’s crises, appealing for peace and dialogue in hotspots including the Middle East, Kenya, Sudan’s Darfur region and Myanmar.

Francis Rooney, the U.S. ambassador to the Holy See, said the Pope’s message showed that the Vatican and the United States have the same foreign policy goals.

“We both place great importance on stopping the spread of terrorism and violence, aiding Christians who are under threat in many parts of the world today, and seeing an end to poverty and hunger which plague so much of Africa,” Rooney said in a statement.

Benedict noted that this month marks the 10th anniversary of Pope John Paul II’s historic pilgrimage to Cuba, and recalled how his predecessor “encouraged all Cubans to work together for a better future.”

“I should like to reiterate this message of hope, which has lost none of its relevance,” Benedict said in his speech, which was delivered in French.

The Pope also reached out to countries that do not have diplomatic relations with the Vatican and urged them to establish ties. He did not name the countries but the mention is seen by diplomats as referring especially to China, with which Benedict is attempting to restore diplomatic relations severed after the 1949 communist revolution.