Category Archives: James Mary’s Blog

Catholic and Homosexual

What follows is the full text of the teaching on homosexuality according to the Catechism of the Catholic Church (1997).

Full Text of Catholic Catechism Regarding Homosexuality – 1997

#2357 Homosexuality refers to relations between men or between women who experience an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction toward persons of the same sex. It has taken a great variety of forms through the centuries and in different cultures. Its psychological genesis remains largely unexplained. Basing itself on Sacred Scripture, which presents homosexual acts as acts of grave depravity, tradition has always declared that “homosexual acts are intrinsically disordered.” They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved.

#2358 The number of men and women who have deep-seated homosexual tendencies is not negligible. This inclination, which is objectively disordered, constitutes for most of them a trial. They must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided. These persons are called to fulfill God’s will in their lives and, if they are Christians, to unite to the sacrifice of the Lord’s Cross the difficulties they may encounter from their condition.

#2359 Homosexual persons are called to chastity. By the virtues of self-mastery that teach them inner freedom, at times by the support of disinterested friendship, by prayer and sacramental grace, they can and should gradually and resolutely approach Christian perfection.

END OF POST

Evangelizing Jesus…

The subject around here this week was children, and especially today:

–On the phone with my mother on her birthday, I noted, “ I’m appalled at the low-level of Catholic faith formation…” Her reply, “Well, the parents don’t know anything either…”

–On the Internet I read the story of a young woman describing her Catholic upbringing, saying, “I had grown up surrounded by the faith of my parents — studied it in school, practiced it at home and at church, and accepted it at face value. I never questioned it — it wasn’t a faith that was my own…”

–This same young girl is now a teacher and youth minister at a prominent all girls Catholic High School who describes her faith today:

“I will be the first to admit, and sometimes quite vocally, that there are many teachings, practices, and attitudes within the Catholic tradition that I don’t agree with. There are times when I’m not just disappointed by this Church, but I’m angered and wounded, and find myself pondering the questions I’m so often asked by others: “Why do you stay?” or, “How can you teach this?”

And the circle perpetuates.

On the drive to my confirmation class this afternoon I realized I was tired. Exhausted, really… Thoughts on our need for true evangelization soon turned into realizations of my own ineffectiveness this year teaching the faith at home and religious ed. at church. There was a contradiction between the Joyful mysteries and my heart as I drove along praying my rosary.

Before class began I noticed a young Asian boy sitting across the table from me. His family is new to the parish, and I didn’t know much about him, In fact, I thought he was a new student, or visitor. I observed him as he talked with the DRE next to me. There was something special about him. The way he talked reminded me of one of my sons. “You seem to be very intelligent to me.” I said. He just looked at me. “What’s your name?” I asked. (I’ll call him Jesus here…) “Jesus”, I said, “how well do you know the faith?” “Faith?” He replied. There was some silence for a bit, and looking back up at me we launched into this conversation:

Jesus: “My mother is dead.”

Jesus: “My father shot my mother and killed her, and he’s in jail.

Me: “That must have really hurt your little heart Jesus, huh?”

Jesus: “Yea.”

Me: “I know how you feel, I lost my father when I was young. That hurt my heart too.”

Jesus: “My mother told me that I shouldn’t cry for her.”

Me: “Oh, no, Jesus, it’s okay to cry. You loved her right? It’s a good thing to cry.”

Jesus: “I did.”

Me: “Did your mother have faith?”

Jesus: “What?”

Me: “Did your mother believe in God?”

Jesus: “Oh yes, she told me that her spirit would be looking over me.”

Me: “Do you pray for your mother, Jesus?”

Me: “You know, that’s why it’s good to know your faith.” To know God exists.” “Before I had faith I didn’t believe, to me my father was just, well, gone, that was that, the end; I wasn’t aware that we have souls. That my father had a soul which was with God, and at the end of time God will reunite–as with each of us–our souls to our bodies.” “And we shall be like Jesus.” “You know Jesus rose from the dead, and His body is glorified.” “We shall be like that.”

Me: “But you can help your mother through your prayers, now.” “We don’t know the state of our parents souls, she may be in heaven already, or in purgatory, which is why it’s always good to pray for our parents.”

Jesus: “What’s purgatory?”

Me: “Jesus, it’s like a cleansing fire of God’s love.” God is a pure spirit, and He cleanses us before entering into heaven.”

Jesus: “I hurt my ankle playing basketball at school today!”

Me: “You like to play basketball, Jesus?” “Me too!” And I showed him a knot on my ankle from twisting it playing.

Jesus: “I played baseball too!”

Me: “You’re kidding me, right?” “I played baseball as a kid too.”

Me: “What team?”

Jesus: “The Astros.”

Me: “Astros, huh? I played on the Angels.”

Jesus: “Sometimes I get real angry.”

Me: “Really?”

Jesus: “Yea.” “Really angry.”

Me: “That’s when you need to pray hard Jesus.”

Me: “Hey, we should get together and play some basketball together.”

Jesus: “Can you shoot 3’s still?”

Me: “Yea, I still can.” “Well… at least for the time being.”

These are the children we’ve heard about…

END OF POST

YouTube: Pull “The Pope Song”

Insulting to Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus Christ, and the Mother of God,  Tim Minchin’s “The Pope Song” is not simply a case of extreme vulgarity which Catholics find offensive, but can only be considered pure hate speech directed towards the religion of millions of American Christians.

According to policy, YouTube  declares that they don’t permit  Hate Speech:  “Speech which attacks or demeans a group based on race or ethnic origin, religion, disability, gender, age, veteran status, and sexual orientation/gender identity”.

Good. We hope they honor their policy.

Notwithstanding any credible allegations by media, charges filed by law enforcement officials, or for that matter arraignment and justice in a court of law, logical and unbiased persons could easily presume that Pope Benedict XVI is an innocent man. And this being the case, there is no reasonable excuse considering the derogatory content of the “The Pope Song” that it shouldn’t be quickly yanked by UTube.  

To Contact YouTube and file your courteous objections: CLICK HERE 

WARNING: OBSCENE MATERIAL

THE VIDEO: On Milk and Cookies /Tim Minchin official UTube Channel

THE LYRICS: On Milk and Cookies

To Contact YouTube and file your courteous objections: CLICK HERE 

END OF POST

How one AP reporter gets the goods on the pope

AP reporter Vanessa Gera:

“Tell me all you know about Ratz, or I’ll flush!!!”

Talk about desperate, or better put, disparaging.

Such was this latest swing-fest at Pope Benedict by AP’s Vanessa Gera: Pope’s ivory tower past adds to his detachment

As you read the article keep count of the personal opinion/attack vs. actual evidence…

Now, I’m off to secretly confer with P.E.T.A.

UPDATE: Fr. Z deconstructs this latest ad hominem on WDTPRS

END OF POST

Emergency Novena for Health Care Legislation

ED. NOTE: I received this today, please join The Orate Fratres Blog in these prayers…

The HEALTHCARE vote is very close. We must do all that we can to keep federal funding of abortion from increasing beyond the Hyde amendment language. This includes prayer. Below I have included a simple emergency novena to pray each day prior to any vote. This novena is attributed to Mother Teresa. It is very simple and merely involves saying the short Memorare prayer nine times throughout each day. We very much need Our Blessed Mother’s help.

_________________________________________________

  • We pray that any health care legislation will not include federal funding for abortion.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

  • We pray that any health care legislation will include full protection of conscience rights for medical providers.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

  • We pray that any health care legislation exclude mandated end of life counseling for elderly and disabled.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

  • We pray that every individual will be able to exercise their right to health care that derives from the fundamental right to life.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

  • We pray that the rights of individuals to have a direct say in their care, reflecting the principle of subsidiarity, will be supported.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

  • We pray that, respectful of the principle of the common good, that we find some way to provide a safety net for people in need without diminishing personal responsibility or creating an inordinately bureaucratic structure.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

  • We pray that the principle of solidarity be embraced recognizing our “connectedness” to each other.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

  • We pray that all pro-life U.S. congressmen stand firm in their position of no expansion of federal funding of abortion.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

  • We pray for a change of heart for those U.S. congressmen who desire to provide expanded federal funding of abortion.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thine intercession was left unaided.

Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my mother; to thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me.

Amen.

Betting Against Benedict: 3/1 odds pope will resign

“All in… Show’em Punk!”

LONDON (Reuters) – Irish bookmaker Paddy Power said Friday it had cut the odds on Pope Benedict XVI resigning after allegations of child abuse by priests in Germany gripped the Roman Catholic Church.

Ireland’s biggest bookmaker, which has branches in Britain as well as Catholic Ireland, said it had cut the odds from 12 to 1 to 3 to 1 following a “cascade of bets.”

The bookie also said it had cut the odds on Nigerian Cardinal Francis Arinze becoming the next Pontiff to 4 to 1, after what it called a significant gamble. The firm said Arinze was now the clear favourite.

Cardinal Angelo Scola of Italy, Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga of Honduras, and Cardinal Peter Turkson of Ghana, all on 8 to 1 were next most likely to succeed.

“The dark clouds of clerical abuse scandals show no sign of abating and recent reports from Germany are surely a little too close to home for the Pope,” the company said in a statement.

The head of Germany’s Roman Catholic Church apologised to victims of child abuse Friday and met Pope Benedict at the Vatican who encouraged him to press ahead with measures to root it out.

As abuse allegations multiplied in Austria and the Netherlands, the Vatican expressed alarm about the gravity of the crisis engulfing the Church this week.

Child abuse scandals in Ireland and the United States have wreaked havoc on the Church’s reputation and finances, with the U.S. Church paying some $2 billion in settlements.

There are very few examples of clear Papal resignations down through the centuries. Pope Celestine V who abdicated in 1294, and Pope Gregory XII who stepped down in 1415 are the best-known examples.

(Reporting by Stefano Ambrogi; Editing by Myra MacDonald)

Chile Missing Persons: Bio Bio River Area — John Dettwiler Rojas (Journalist) and family

EDITOR: I received this request for help in Spanish tonight; my Google translation into English follows:

‘Alabado sea el Señor.

Con el trágico terremoto que ha asolado a Chile en estos días he perdido todo contacto con la familia de mi hijo el Sr. Juan Dettwiler Rojas, periodista, que vive en una población que está a orillas del río Bio Bio. Les estaría muy agradecido si pudieran enviarme un recado si saben algo sobre ellos.’

Rough translation:

“With the tragic earthquake that struck Chile in those days I have lost contact with the family of my son Mr. John Dettwiler Rojas, a journalist who lives in a town that lies on the banks of the river Bio Bio. I would be grateful if you could send me a message if you know anything about them.”

I’m sending off for more specific information from John’s father Juan, but if you have any news on John and his family please post below/or click here and post. Also, if you would be kind enough to post this same information on your sites, e-mails lists, and chat rooms it would be most appreciated…

Thank you, Editor

Rebuilding the Church –“In Haiti, the church is like a central living womb for the community”

 

Rebuilding the Roman Catholic Church in Haiti — all but wiped out in the earthquake — will take years, but the process has already begun…  

   

Churches rising out of the ruins

BY JAWEED KALEEM AND FRANCES ROBLES  

jkaleem@MiamiHerald.com  

CONGREGATIONS CONTINUE: At St. Louis Roi church, the pews have been plucked from the rubble and are now lined up for outdoor services  

PORT-AU-PRINCE — Mass at Port-au-Prince’s Sacred Heart Catholic church is held under a UNICEF tarp beside Coleman tents. Open-air, it’s conducted near the statue of the Virgin Mary, one of the few church treasures to survive the Jan. 12 earthquake.  

“We don’t have anything else,” said Bertta Chery, who recently attended a service amid the ruins of the 105-year-old house of worship, one of Haiti’s most treasured. “We are all in the streets.”  

With dozens of others, all dressed in their Sunday best, she prayed for the dead, for the living and — in a deeply faithful country where three out of five people are Catholic and most others are Protestant — for churches to rise again.  

More than three weeks after disaster shattered Haitian life, the Archdiocese of Port-au-Prince, the U.S. Catholic church and the Vatican have quietly begun the task of rebuilding the Catholic church in Haiti, arguably the country’s hardest-hit institution. Churches of other denominations are also looking toward reconstruction.  

Sacred Heart was among at least 60 Catholic churches that collapsed in the 7.0 quake that killed more than 100 nuns and priests and the top church leadership. It’s estimated that seven out of every 10 Catholic churches were lost. Damage estimates run in the tens of millions of dollars.  

The earthquake is believed to be the most devastating natural disaster to hit a Catholic diocese, said Bishop Joseph Lafontant. With the death of the archbishop and vicar general of Port-au-Prince, Lafontant is now one of the church’s top leaders in Haiti.  

“As for material things — we can rebuild,” he said last week during a break from a daylong meeting with surviving priests. “In lives, the archdiocese suffered.”  

In a country where the government has always struggled to provide even the most basic services, the Catholic Church has always been a lifeline — it runs schools, hospitals, orphanages and charities.  

“In Haiti, the church is like a central living womb for the community,” said the Rev. Reginald Jean-Mary of Miami’s Notre Dame d’Haiti church, who has been conducting prayers and officiating funerals at Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Church in Port-au-Prince.  

Complicating matters is the migration of tens of thousands of Haitians from Port-au-Prince, the church’s nerve center, to provincial towns and rural areas less impacted by the quake.  

The Catholic church is less entrenched there, straining the limited resources even further. Protestant missionaries have taken up some of the slack.  

HELP FROM OUTSIDE  

“We’re talking about tens if not hundreds of millions of dollars of damage,” said the Rev. Andrew Small of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, speaking only of the damage to church structures. The Vatican has tasked the U.S. church with spearheading reconstruction in Haiti, and Small is leading that effort.  

Last week, Bishop Pierre Andre-Dumas of the Diocese of Anse–Veau et Miragone in western Haiti, met with Pope Benedict XVI and international Catholic leaders in Italy and appealed for aid to rebuild the Haitian church. Catholic groups around the world are beginning to respond.  

Two German Catholic aid organizations have dedicated $6 million to the effort.  

In late January, stateside churches raised $10 million through a special collection for relief and rebuilding. Small expects another $7.5 million to be raised in an annual collection to facilitate church growth in the Americas. Often funneled into disaster areas, much of that money will likely go to Haiti.  

Catholic churches from other countries will also play a part in rebuilding.  

“This is a many-year process,” said Small, who recently flew to Port-au-Prince to evaluate damages.  

As a modest first step, the U.S. Catholic church has sent $30,000 worth of equipment to revitalize Radio Soleil, a Catholic radio station operating out of a van in minimally damaged Pétionville. While vast numbers of Haitians still don’t have churches to attend, they can listen to prayers on the radio, Small said.  

PREVIOUS BIG EFFORTS  

This is not the first large-scale church reconstruction stemming from an epic disaster.  

When two devastating earthquakes — 7.6 and 6.6 on the Richter scale — hit El Salvador in early 2001, the U.S. Catholic church gave $1.5 million toward an international effort to rebuild 80 churches over three years. In 2007, when a 7.0 earthquake jolted Ica on the Peruvian coast, U.S. Catholics gave $300,000 to rebuild. And when hurricanes swept through Cuba in 2008, the U.S. church allocated $800,000 toward ongoing church rebuilding.  

Yet, restoring the Haitian church will take longer and be costlier than anything that’s come before.  

“You are not just talking about the church buildings. You are talking schools, clinics and dispensaries, convents and seminaries,” said Bishop Thomas Wenski of Orlando, a former Miami pastor who is working with Small on rebuilding.  

“It’s safe to say Port-au-Prince will need a cathedral again and the country will need seminaries once again, but where they are and how we go about doing it will need to be decided with the Haitians,” Small added.  

PLANS FOR THE FUTURE  

The Rev. Jean-Mary of Notre Dame d’Haiti is one of several South Florida Catholic clergymen to rushed to Haiti to fill the spiritual void. Others include the Rev. Robés Charles of St. Clement in Wilton Manors and the Rev. Jean Pierre of St. James in North Miami.  

They are spearheading an effort that will soon have South Florida priests taking rotations there.  

“You have bodies of your people, students, still in the rubble,” Jean-Mary said. “The survivors are in a state of shock. They are people of faith. They are not supermen and women. Down the road, construction of the church will be essential. Without that, people cannot go on.”  

Continue story here

END OF POST

Catholic Climategate: Truth Vs. Falsehood

 

“We have, of course, the patron of the environment. I asked the children at school here, recently, I was talking the environment, and I asked, I checked the school, and asked, does anyone know who the patron saint of the environment is? A little girl put up her hand, a 12 year-old, she said, St. Al Gore…”    

Irish Archbishop Dermot Clifford   

   

  “Fear makes men believe the worst.”    

Quintus Curtius Rufus (fl. 100 AD, Roman Historian)   

  On 10 November 2009 Irish Bishops launched a pastoral reflection on climate change entitled ‘The Cry of the Earth’ [HERE]. The pastoral from the Irish Catholic Bishops Council calls for ‘ecological conversion’ of everyone and among other recommendations aimed at educating Catholics and inspiring local eco-action, prods their conversion through spiritual formation–inviting pastors to include the theme of care for God’s creation in homilies, prayers of the faithful, and even, examinations of conscience.  

At the launch of “Cry of the Earth” Archbishop Dermot Clifford was joined by other contributors to the pastoral including Professor John Sweeney. Prof Sweeney is a geographer attached to the Irish Climate Analysis and Research Units in the department of geography at NUI, Maynooth. He was a contributing author and review editor of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). With several hundred other climatologists, he shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore. Speaking during the launch, Professor Sweeney’s comments included the following statement:   

“Belief in global climate change is not a matter of faith. The evidence that the planet is undergoing rapid climate change is factual and beyond scientific dispute. In terms of causation, for almost all the world’s atmospheric scientists, the debate about the human contribution to climate change is now over.”   

Well, maybe not…   

10 days later, On November 20th, news flashed across the internet [Climategate: the final nail in the coffin of ‘Anthropogenic Global Warming’? ] reporting that hacked and/or leaked e-mails revealed concrete evidence that publicly funded climate scientists responsible for collecting, assessing, confirming, and informing the international community concerning real or perceived threats of Global Warming had, quote, “perverted their science in the service of social and political causes.”    

Early on into what is now being called the greatest scandal ever within the scientific community, one columnist reading from the e-mails went on to charge the prominent scientists with, quote: “Conspiracy, collusion in exaggerating warming data, possibly illegal destruction of embarrassing information, organised resistance to disclosure, manipulation of data, private admissions of flaws in their public claims, and, perhaps, most troubling of all, communication between one another on how best to squeeze dissenting scientists out of the peer review process.”   

Catholic Green Schools    

Also present with Archbishop Clifford and Prof Sweeny at the Launch of “Cry of the Earth” was environmentalist  Fr. Sean McDonagh SSC, Author of  ‘A Green Cristology’ and many other eco-works, including the paper “Climate Change, The Response of Catholics”, which I read.  

In it, Fr. McDonaugh concludes that global warming will have, in the main, a negative impact on human kind and most other forms of life in the biosphere. He goes on to ask: 

 “So what steps should the Catholic Church take globally to deal with this reality that is poised to bring pain, suffering and death to millions of humans and other creatures?” 

  His response was, “The Churches should be in the forefront in tackling global warming at the moral level.”  

 “Scary stuff”, I thought to myself as I read along. And how much more so for Irish Catholic school children whose futures according to the “Cry of the Earth” pastoral, which Prof Sweeney helped author, consists in this terrifying scenario:  

  • Increasing heat waves, floods, storms, fire and droughts, causing death and displacement for hundreds of millions of people. Between 200 and 600 million people will experience extreme hunger.
  • By 2080 between 1.1 and 3.2 billion people will face water shortages.
  • Flood waters could make life difficult for between 2 and 7 million people in New York and Tokyo alone. The effect would be greater in cities such as Shanghai, Lagos, Rio de Janeiro or Manila.
  • A rise of 1 to 2 degrees Celsius could see the extinction of one third of the species of the world.
  • Glaciers retreating in the Himalayas will affect billions of people in Asia. This would create tens of millions of environmental refugees, who would be forced to leave their place because it is no longer habitable.

This last, glacier retreat in the Himalayas affecting billions, has come under recent attacks by sceptics because of speculative evidence offered up as truth and obstinately defended without apology by Rajendra Pachauri, chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. And just today, [HERE] Pachauri finds himself under increased pressure to resign after the head of Greenpeace called for him to step down. Indeed, a quick Google of Rejendra Pauchauri finds [HERE] the real possibility of personal financial conflict of interest with the position he holds as Chairman of the IPCC. 

All this will be flushed out in the end, of course, and is not the pure focus of this post. But, the situation in Ireland does cause wonderment here in America… 

If a non-Catholic member of the now highly suspect IPCC such as Prof Sweeney is invited to help author a Catholic pastoral in which compromised climate data was used as evidence to fortify doomsday scenarios, and thus scare Catholic populations into action, including our children, we must ask what many other international organizations and authorities are attempting to discover about the IPCC today, namely: 

Was this intentional manipulation? And if so, for what purpose(s)? 

There’s also this question that comes to mind — Who is educating Catholic bishops and school educators in America on the truth or falsehood of climate change science? 

After all, this is not just a simple push or reminder to use common sense as good stewards of the earth, but instead, as happens in Ireland, is an all-out effort directed toward the complete re-orientation of Catholic school systems in re-educating our children… As the following video from the Archdiocese of Chicago seems to reveal, ‘the greening of our children in defense of the climate and salvation of the planet appears to supercede the greater commission of defending the faith from error and saving souls for Christ…   

Let me know what you think on the subject…

Next Post: “Whose educating who in the greening of our schools?”

ED. NOTE: I’m not a scientist. If there are errors here I’ll gladly give way to truth if I’m in error…. But, will the IPCC?

END OF POST  

Happy Birthday Hannah!

 

Happy Birthday Hannah!

Love, Papa

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