R.I.P **** H. Norman Schwarzkopf

norm19910513-750-46

Led US-Allied Forces to Victory, Driving Iraqi Leader Saddam Hussein‘s Forces From Kuwait in 1991

H. Norman Schwarzkopf, the retired general credited with leading U.S.-allied forces to a victory in the first Gulf War, has died at age 78, a U.S. official has confirmed to ABC News.

Schwarzkopf died in Tampa, Fla., today, a U.S. official told the Associated Press.

Schwarzkopf, known by the nickname “Stormin’ Norman” partly because of his volcanic temper, actually led Republican administrations to two military victories: a small one in Grenada during the administration of President Reagan and a big one as de facto commander of allied forces in the Gulf War.

Schwarzkopf’s success driving Iraqi forces out of Kuwait in 1991 during what was known as Operation Desert Storm came under President George H.W. Bush.

In a statement issued through his office, Bush said he and his wife, Barbara Bush, were mourning Schwartzkopf’s death — though Bush, himself, was ill, hospitalized in Texas with a stubborn fever and on a liquids-only diet.

“Barbara and I mourn the loss of a true American patriot and one of the great military leaders of his generation,” Bush’s statement read. “A distinguished member of that Long Gray Line hailing from West Point, Gen. Norm Schwarzkopf, to me, epitomized the ‘duty, service, country’ creed that has defended our freedom and seen this great nation through our most trying international crises. More than that, he was a good and decent man — and a dear friend. Barbara and I send our condolences to his wife, Brenda, and his wonderful family.”

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who was chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during Desert Storm, recalled Schwarzkopf as “a great patriot and a great soldier.”

“Norm served his country with courage and distinction for over 35 years,” Powell said in a prepared statement. “The highlight of his career was the 1991 Persian Gulf War, Operation Desert Storm. ‘Stormin’ Norman’ led the coalition forces to victory, ejecting the Iraqi Army from Kuwait and restoring the rightful government. His leadership not only inspired his troops, but also inspired the nation.

“He was a good friend of mine, a close buddy,” Powell added. “I will miss him.”

Schwarzkopf, the future four-star general, was raised as an army brat in Iran, Switzerland, Germany and Italy, following in his father’s footsteps to West Point and being commissioned as a second lieutenant in 1956.

Schwarzkopf’s father, who shared his name, directed the investigation of the Lindbergh baby kidnapping as head of the New Jersey State Police, later becoming a bridgadier general in the U.S. Army.

The younger Schwarzkopf earned three Silver Stars for bravery during two tours in Vietnam, gaining a reputation as an opinionated, plain-spoken commander with a sharp temper who would risk his own life for his soldiers.

Get the rest of the story…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s