Seizing the executioner’s sword — Gov. Kitzhaber does the right thing, death penalty unnecessary

Moratorium is right

Gov. John Kitzhaber has done the right thing in following his conscience. Haunted by acquiescence in two executions during the 1990s, the governor would not sign off on another and has called instead for a moratorium on the death penalty and statewide discussion on the practice.

That means convicted murder Gary Haugen will not receive a lethal injection as planned on Dec. 6. Haugen wants to die and he bears great guilt as opposed to the thousands of innocent unborn babies killed each year in our state; we want no part of either kind of death.

The Catholic Church taught that capital punishment was allowable as a last resort to protect society. But in Evangelium Vitae in 1995, Pope John Paul wrote that modern methods of incarceration have made the death penalty unnecessary in almost all cases.
Had we killed Haugen, we would have borne guilt of our own.

The United States, in allowing executions, is in dubious company. No other developed nation allows capital punishment, but those that do include Afghanistan, China, Iran, Iraq, North Korea, Somalia and Zimbabwe.

Haugen was slated to die on Dec. 6, the feast of St. Nicholas. That would have been a poignant date, since it was St. Nicholas who in the 4th century saved three prisoners who were about to be beheaded by the ruler of Myra in Asia Minor. Nicholas, bishop of the region, waded through a crowd of watchers, seized the executioner’s sword and threw it to the ground.

We are glad to be part of a church still keeping an eye out for justice and we thank Gov. Kitzhaber for his action. We can only hope that he will remember this experience of exercising conscience when time comes for him to consider conscience rights for health workers who choose not to be associated with abortion and contraception.

Catholic teaching on the death penalty…

Catechism of the Catholic Church – 2267

Assuming that the guilty party’s identity and responsibility have been fully determined, the traditional teaching of the Church does not exclude recourse to the death penalty, if this is the only possible way of effectively defending human lives against the unjust aggressor. If, however, non-lethal means are sufficient to defend and protect people’s safety from the aggressor, authority will limit itself to such means, as these are more in keeping with the concrete conditions of the common good and more in conformity with the dignity of the human person. Today, in fact, as a consequence of the possibilities which the state has for effectively preventing crime, by rendering one who has committed an offense incapable of doing harm – without definitely taking away from him the possibility of redeeming himself – the cases in which the execution of the offender is an absolute necessity “are very rare, if not practically non-existent.”  Catechism of the Catholic Church – 2267

SOURCE:  CATHOLIC SENTINEL

END OF POST

3 thoughts on “Seizing the executioner’s sword — Gov. Kitzhaber does the right thing, death penalty unnecessary”

  1. Good post. But it seems that Pope John Paul II may have gone on a little diversion from previous Church teaching on the death penalty. Evangelium Vitae influenced the writings or some additions to the writings in the new updated Catechism. While it may or may not be necessary for Gary Haugen to be subject to capital punishment in order to keep the public safe there have been a decent number of inmates in recent years who have broken out of prison so I do believe that capital punishment is necessary in limited circumstances and should also be used as a deterrent. Since the death penalty was lifted in Illinois there have been at least a few people who have admitted to committing heinous crimes because the death penalty was lifted. Or that played a role in their decision making in committing those crimes. In addition, if the Church were to say that it is absolutely against capital punishment that would be Her going against 2000 years of Church Tradition on Capital punishment.

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